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Stakeholders discussed the first draft of the Information Policy Concept of the Kyrgyz Republic

Stakeholders discussed the first draft of the Information Policy Concept of the Kyrgyz Republic

Since January 2021, wide-scale consultations with representatives of the media sector and civil society are being organized by the Media Dialogue project to ensure inclusive and participatory drafting of the Information Policy Concept of the Kyrgyz Republic. After months of joint work, on April 29 – May 1 a conference took place in Issyk-Kul to discuss the first draft of the Information Policy Concept, which was drafted by an interdepartmental working group and experts following analyses and consultations with all interest groups. 

Representatives of the media sector, government agencies, legal experts, bloggers, digital activists, and academic circles had a fruitful discussion at the conference. As a result, feedback and recommendations from all stakeholders were incorporated in the final document, which was then disseminated among participants for further comments and additions. The next conference to present the final document is planned for the beginning of June. 

“We were divided into several groups. The work of our working group is focused on state and legal regulation of issues of providing access to information. We propose to monitor, analyze, and improve legislation on the media, access to information, and ensure the inviolability of a journalist’s legal activities. We also believe that it is necessary to establish departmental responsibility of state and municipal bodies for violations in freedom of speech and access to information, identify measures to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of providing access to information, including on a proactive basis. The main thing we propose is to create equal conditions for the development of media, the production of creative content, access to budgetary resources, regardless of the form of ownership of the content producers”- said Nargiza Abdraimova, an expert at the Westminster Foundation for Democracy sharing the experience of the first group. 

“The final round of our work on the development and adoption of the Information Policy Concept of the Kyrgyz Republic is underway. To date, the draft of the document is ready. We realize that the Concept, which will be adopted for the next five years, becomes clear and extensive. According to the Concept, government agencies and the media market will clearly understand how they will move. I express the hope that the adopted Concept will not only be realistic, but also will be successfully implemented and create favorable conditions for the development of the media sector, as well as for the preservation and further development of the institute of freedom of speech and freedom of expression,” said Salkyn Sarnoeva, Director of the Department of Information and Mass Communications of the Ministry of Culture, Information, Sports and Youth Policy. 

The conference also strengthened collaborative links among stakeholders and enhanced accountability for the implementation of the Concept. Thus, members of the Working Group on developing the Concept signed a “Memorandum of intent to create a public platform to facilitate the implementation of the Information Policy Concept of the Kyrgyz Republic for 2021-2025.” 

 

Memorandum of Intent to create a public platform to assist

in the implementation of the Information Policy Concept of the Kyrgyz Republic

for 2021-2015

 

We, members of the working group on the development of the Information Policy Concept of the Kyrgyz Republic for 2021-2015 (hereinafter referred to as the “Concept”), representatives of the media community, while understanding the value and importance of implementing the Concept and achieving the goals and objectives set out in it, as well as the need to ensure sustainable participation of the media community in the implementation of the Concept,

by signing this Memorandum, we agreed to create and participate in the work of the Media Dialogue public platform, designed:

– to assist in the development of a consolidated position of the media community on the development of media, regardless of their organizational, legal, and ownership forms;

– to assist in the high-quality implementation of the Concept, as well as subsequent conceptual documents in the media field;

– ensure the participation and consideration of the opinion of the media community in the development and discussion of draft laws and regulations in the field of media, freedom of speech, and access to information;

– to support the institutional memory of the media community and the continuity of the media agenda.

We invite those who share the above goals to join this Memorandum by signing it.

 

April 30, 2021

Chok-Tal village, Issyk-Kul region

 

News, Trainings and Seminars

Representatives of Media, Civil Society, and Digital Activists Learned the Basics of Cybersecurity and Digital Hygiene

Representatives of Media, Civil Society, and Digital Activists Learned the Basics of Cybersecurity and Digital Hygiene

 

Cybersecurity is an integral part of our lives today, it is protecting information from malicious users who can harm us. Many people mistakenly believe that they are not the target of the scammers. However, everyone needs to have basic skills in cybersecurity and digital hygiene.  In April – May of the current year, the Media Dialogue project jointly with the Civic Initiative of Internet Policy conducted training for more than 50 media representatives, organizations of civil society, digital activists and universities instructors on the basics of cybersecurity and digital hygiene.

The trainers were legal experts in the field of IT / ICT, specialists in the field of digital law and protection of personal data Irina Baikulova and Marat Torobekov, trainer on cybersecurity Eldar Bozhokoev, as well as an international expert in cybersecurity Valery Zubanov.

Participants learned about their rights to protect personal data, liability for the dissemination of illegal information, cybersecurity landscape, security risks in social networks, protection of electronic communications and digital data.

 

Unfortunately, civic activists, journalists, and bloggers are very much targets of cyber-attacks. When it comes to cybersecurity and safety, we are never safe, and there is always something new to learn, even people who are more literate on this topic can still be very much target in this respect. I hope this training can help you enhance your resilience to cyber threats and be safer.

— Vittoria Zanellati, Programmes Officer, European Partnership for Democracy

 

I realized that until today, I did not follow elementary rules of digital security. Thus, the training was useful for us, as we received insights into digital rights, digital data protection, and cybersecurity. The training sessions were conducted in an engaging and easy-to-digest mode.

— Asel Zhumalieva, a Deputy of the Local Council of Nizhniy Ala-Archa Rural County

 

The training is crucial for civil society activists working with the population and conducting training. We need to work securely with our accounts in social networks and personal emails. It is necessary to know how and when to publish and take security measures so that our personal data were protected. It turns out that we did not know the elementary things. This training allowed us to review our behavior in the digital space.

— Gulzhan Baibetova, Executive Director of Women’s Democracy Network

 

 I learned new things I hadn’t even thought about before. For example, I did not pay attention to the logical, physical and digital protection of the device. Now I know that such indifference as “who cares about me?” can threaten my personal safety and of surrounding me people. In the age of technology and digitalization, everyone who has access to the Internet needs to be cyber literate. I take the opportunity to thank the Media Dialogue project and trainers for new knowledge.

— Blogger, Bayzn Amantaeva

        

 

News, Trainings and Seminars

Journalists of Osh, Batken and Jalal-Abad Learned More About the Conflict-Sensitive Journalism

Journalists of Osh, Batken and Jalal-Abad Learned More About the Conflict-Sensitive Journalism

On April 1-3, the Media Dialogue project, together with the National Mediation Center, conducted trainings on conflict-sensitive journalism and the legal aspects of the activities of journalists during the election period for representatives of regional multimedia centers, independent mass media, academics and students of journalism departments, Territorial Election Commissions, media sector and civil society of Osh, Batken and Jalal-Abad regions. The training covered such topics as causes of conflicts, conflict analysis tools, conflict-sensitive approach to journalism, hate speech in the media, fake news, and the importance of conflict analysis for journalists. Particular attention was paid to the session on information support for elections, since the risks of conflicts increase during this period.

The leading trainer of the event, Chairman of the Supervisory Board of the Republican Community of Mediators of the Kyrgyz Republic, Gulsina Kozhoyarova, noted that the participants show particular interest in sessions on the rights and obligations of the media, especially during the election period, voter information and election campaigning.

“Together with the journalists of Osh, Jalal-Abad and Batken regions, I attended a three-day training on conflict sensitive journalism. The training was indeed useful, especially I liked how closely trainers interacted with the participants and constantly asked for feedback. We were able not only to gain new knowledge on conflict-sensitive journalism, but also to analyze our previous experience related to conflict  situations,” said Aziza Pusurmankulova, one of the participants.

Photos of the slide-show: @Gulsina Kozhoyarova

 

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Petition to political parties and candidates to prevent the use of hate speech and promote more tolerant speech during elections to local councils

Petition to political parties and candidates to prevent the use of hate speech and promote  more tolerant speech during elections to local councils

On March 17, a campaign  to prevent hate speech was launched in Kyrgyzstan ahead of elections to local councils. The campaign is led by the Westminster Foundation for Democracy(WFD) jointly with the PF “Civic Platform” within the framework of the Media Dialogue project, funded by the European Union. During online discussions with youth groups, a petition to political parties and candidates was developed to prevent the use of hate speech and promote  more tolerant speech during elections to local councils.

 PETITION TO CANDIDATES

Elections to local keneshes on April 11, 2021

To candidates standing for elections to local keneshes!

We, the active youth from the network of civic organizations “For fair elections” gathered in consultative meetings on the 23-24 of March 2021 to collectively emphasise that we stand for a society free from discrimination and prejudice based on gender, religion or belief, race, ethnic origin, nationality or any other identity!

We are aware of the important role of party/candidates’ play in organizing and conducting the electoral campaign and through this fosters a favourable and peaceful atmosphere based on mutual respect, equality and dignity of each person.

We ask candidates to make sure that all their actions and statements will protect human rights, especially the freedom of expression and protection against discrimination and refrain from hostile language towards other electoral contestants.

In achieving honest and fair elections, we youth would like to see candidates to be committed to the following:

  • Show tolerance towards members or representatives of other political parties, candidates and voters throughout the electoral process to help support a stable and peaceful electoral environment, and avoid discrimination and prejudice based on gender, religion or belief, race, ethnic origin, nationality or any other identity;
  • Do not incite, assist or facilitate intimidation in any form of candidates, party members, representatives or supporters of political parties, candidates or voters during the entire electoral process;
  • Create conditions to prevent the provocation of conflicts, as well as not to use the “language of enmity and hatred” in media and social resources;
  • Avoid publication of false or defamatory accusations or intentional unfounded statements against opponents throughout the entire electoral process;
  • Refrain from acts containing violence, whether physical or psychological, discrimination and hostility towards opponents in order to demonstrate the strength of a political party/candidate or prove its/his/her superiority, and avoid focusing on the ethnic, regional, gender, linguistic and other identification of candidates of political parties, both their own and competing ones;
  • Not to promote destruction or damage of posters, billboards or any other election materials of political parties or candidates;
  • Promote equality and integration to ensure equal opportunity for all electoral contestant and voters with members complying with a “non-aggressive” campaigning policy,
  • Establish ethical rules on your social media pages, prohibit comments that incite any discord, offensive and provide with more positive information, and avoid using trolls and fake accounts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A Campaign to Avoid Hate Speech is Launched Ahead of Local Elections in Kyrgyzstan

A Campaign to Avoid Hate Speech

is Launched Ahead of Local Elections in Kyrgyzstan

 

  Westminster Foundation for Democracy (WFD) jointly with the Public foundation “Civic Platform” launched a Hate Speech Campaign in Kyrgyzstan in the run up to the April local elections. The campaign is conducted within the frames of the Media Dialogue project funded by European Union and aims at preventing and countering the use of hate speech.  The campaign will target candidates to city councils, the legal community, media, CSOs, and youth groups.

Election campaigns provide particularly fertile ground for hate speech and incitement to hatred. Political parties, candidates, other opinion makers, and members of civil society are among influential spreaders of hate speech. Also, the power and amplifying effect of the media, in particular social media, carries significant weight.  According to ARTICLE 19, “Hate Speech is an emotive concept, and there is no universally accepted definition of it in international human rights law. Many would claim they can identify Hate Speech where they see it, but the criteria for doing so are often elusive or contradictory. As such Hate Speech can be seen in any expression imparting opinions or ideas – bringing an internal opinion or idea to an external audience. It can take many forms: written, non-verbal, visual, artistic, etc., and may be disseminated through any media, including internet, print, radio, or television.”

The Hate Speech Campaign kicked off with the analysis of legislation related to the issue of the use of hate speech and incitement to hatred in the beginning of March. On March 17, a round table discussion on preventing and countering the use of hate speech in the run up to the April local elections took place. Participants included experts from the Central Election Commission, from the legal community, linguists, as well as representatives of media and CSOs. This discussion created a platform for experts to come to a common understanding of the definition of hate speech in the Kyrgyzstani context, of the actions to be taken as well as recommendations on how to work and raise the awareness among political candidates on hate speech and positive measures to promote more tolerant speech.

A series of online discussions are taking place with the youth groups, including youth activists, bloggers, and lawyers from southern and northern regions to discuss hate speech practices and develop an open appeal to avoid hate speech and use a more tolerant language by political parties and candidates during local kenesh elections. In parallel, online discussions with the candidates to city councils from 21 cities will be conducted to reduce hate speech practices during the pre-election campaign.

Photo: @ PF “Civic Platform”

 

News, Trainings and Seminars

Media Dialogue devotes its monthly Talk to the challenges and trends in investigative journalism

Media Dialogue Devotes its Monthly Talk

to the Challenges and Trends in Investigative Journalism

 

On March 17, the Media Dialogue project funded by European Union will hold its second public Media Dialogue Talk, devoted to the topic of “Investigative Journalism – How to Create High-Quality Material.” Journalists and media managers, civil society representatives, activists, and influencers are invited to the event. Roman Dobrokhotov, the founder and Editor-In-Chief of the Moscow-based independent online newspaper The Insider specializing in investigative journalism and fact-checking will take part in the event as a main speaker.  Investigative journalists from Kyrgyzstan – a founder of Temirov LIVE channel Bolot Temirov and a founder of “Ali Toktakunov Media Hub” Ali Tottakunov will also intervene and share their experience and vision of the development of investigative journalism.

During the meeting with the professional media community of Kyrgyzstan, Roman Dobrokhotov will present the tools at the disposal of investigative journalism, and share insights into his most famous investigations, on what difficulties investigative journalists face and why the future of professional journalism lies precisely with investigation and fact-checking. In addition, Roman Dobrokhotov will touch upon issues of journalists safety, media independence and models for media monetization. Bolot Temirov and Ali Toktakunov will talk about the challenges investigative journalism is facing and what to look for when working on materials and facts in Kyrgyzstan.

Media Dialogue Talks are monthly seminars to facilitate exchange of experiences and the creation of collaborative links amongst the community of media, civil society, and civic and digital activists of Kyrgyzstan.

News, Trainings and Seminars

Workshops on Priority Directions of Information Policy Concept of the Kyrgyz Republic took place in Bishkek and regions

 Workshops on Priority Directions of Information Policy Concept of the Kyrgyz Republic took place in Bishkek and regions

 The European Partnership for Democracy has been supporting the elaboration of the Information Policy Concept of the Kyrgyz Republic in the framework of the Media Dialogue project. On March 4, a workshop was held to define the key problems and challenges affecting priority areas that will be addressed by the Concept. The process of developing and drafting of the Information Policy Concept is based on principles of inclusivity and participation. Therefore, a similar workshop took place in Osh, Jalal-Abad and Batken regions on March 11-12, to further develop and discuss the challenges identified also with media representatives from the southern regions. 

Priority directions include the legal framework of information policy, digital sovereignty and development of national content, development of the media sector, and professionalization of media community. 

“The task of today’s discussion is to supplement to key problems since each region has its specifics. It was important for us to hear the opinion and vision of the journalists of Osh, Jalal-Abad and Batken regions from different media about what the priority areas of the Concept should be. We have heard and collected the opinions and ideas that are being put forward throughout the country,” Media Dialogue project manager Cholpon Nogoibayeva during the event in Jalal-Abad.

Diana Raimzhaniva Deputy Director Jalal-Abad Regional Media Center shared her impression from the event: “Journalists from state and independent media, as well as activists, came to the workshop today to discuss together vital problems and challenges facing the media sector. We appreciate that the Media Dialogue project organized this workshop, as our voices will be heard and our proposals will be taken into account when adopting the Concept.”

 

News, Trainings and Seminars

Stakeholders Discuss the Inclusive Development of the Information Policy Concept

Stakeholders Discuss the Inclusive Development of the Information Policy Concept

On 17 and 18 February, within in the framework of the EU funded Media Dialogue project, the European Partnership for Democracy (EPD) is conducting a workshop to support the collective planning of the participatory dialogue process on information policy in the Kyrgyz Republic. Representatives of mass media, media organizations, nongovernmental sector, academics, the Ministry of Culture, Information, Sports and Youth Policy, the State Committee of National Security, the Ministry of Interior take part in the event as the main stakeholders of the dialogue process.

Building on the EPD experience of facilitating policy dialogue in fifteen countries through the INSPIRED method, first-hand insights are presented to the participants on how to deliver policy outcomes through dialogue. Moreover, dialogue participants are introduced to a set of tools to nurture trust dynamics and will establish a set of guiding principles for cooperation that will guide them throughout the next steps of the dialogue process.

The Ministry of Culture, Information, Sports and Youth Policy included the development and adoption of the Concept to its agenda for 2021. In this regard, the Media Dialogue project laying the foundations for the inclusive development of the Information Policy Concept of the Kyrgyz Republic through an inclusive policy dialogue.

Director of the Information and Mass Communications Department of the Ministry of Culture, Information, Sports and Youth Policy Salkyn Sarnogoeva noted that the development of the Information Policy Concept is in the agenda of the Ministry for this year and that the international experience and knowledge will be useful in this regard: “The experience of our colleagues from Europe is important for us because the institutions of democracy and freedom of speech have been successfully preserved and developed in Europe. I would like that Kyrgyzstan, a country that positions itself as an island of democracy, will successfully preserve and develop freedom of speech and democracy. It is important to elaborate the document on Information Policy. It will allow all of us – not only government bodies but also the media community to understand which direction we are moving. In the next few years, we will be able to move ahead in accordance with the Concept that will be elaborated.”

Expressing his expectations for the workshop, Semetey Amanbekov, Deputy Chairman of the Independent Union of Journalists, said: “Kyrgyzstanis are aware of the concepts of the principles of democracy, the rule of law, and freedom of speech. We can proudly say that we are learning the lessons of international democracy by leaps and bounds. Unfortunately, there is such a problem that a certain gap has formed between civil society, the media, the non-governmental sector, and state bodies – it is the absence of an adequate full-format dialogue. Therefore, at this workshop, I want to hear about practical actions – how in Europe and other countries of the world the issue of establishing a full-fledged dialogue between civil society and government bodies is being resolved.”

About INSPIRED: Developed by the EPD and co-financed by the European Union, INSPIRED is a method for constructive participation of civil society and other stakeholders in policy dialogue, contributing to building trust between them. More info: https://epd.eu/inspired/“.

 

News, Trainings and Seminars

The development of the Information Policy Concept started today

The development of the Information Policy Concept started today

The Media Dialogue project held a workshop today to lay the foundations for the inclusive development of the Information Policy Concept of the Kyrgyz Republic, with the participation of representatives of mass media, media organizations, nongovernmental sector, the Ministry of Culture Information and Tourism (MinCIT), the State Committee of National Security, the Ministry of Interior and the Media Dialogue project.

The event kicked off with a joint discussion on the current status of the implementation of information policy in the Kyrgyz Republic and of potential approaches to the development of such policy. The participants discussed the goal and priorities to be included in the Concept, its duration and structure, and made a mapping of the key stakeholders to be involved throughout the drafting process.

The Director of the Information and Mass Communication Department of the Ministry of Culture, Information and Tourism, Salkyn Sarnogoyeva, noted that Kyrgyzstan does not have a conceptual document defining the country’s information policy and added:

” It is necessary to bring the national media legislation in line with international journalism standards and the opportunities offered by the digital age, and to strengthen the country’s information policy accordingly. Therefore, the MinCIT included the development of the Information Policy Concept into its plan of action for 2021 and we are glad to work together with media actors and stakeholder in the Concept elaboration process”.

The Media Dialogue project Manager, Cholpon Nogoibaeva, noted: “We will organize wide-scale consultations with the entire media sector and representatives and the civil society. Today we are discussing the Concept as a document and as a process that will take several months to develop. What is the aim of the information policy, how it should be regulated, what are its priorities, what are the basic principles of the information policy – these all are important topics to be addressed.”

News

Monitoring Online Hate Speech in the Kyrgyzstan Election

Monitoring Online Hate Speech in the Kyrgyzstan Election

With contributions from the Westminster Foundation for Democracy’s team, Ben Graham Jones – a freelance consultant on elections and an expert in social media monitoring methodologies – sheds lights on the innovative approaches to monitor instances of hate speech online pioneered in the framework of the Media Dialogue project by Kloop media and the Independent Union of Journalists of Kyrgyzstan. 

The Covid-19 pandemic has accelerated the digitisation of election campaigns. This has accelerated challenge facing election analysts to effectively monitor the online environment. Yet in parallel with ongoing digitisation, pioneers within the field of election observation are developing innovative new methodologies to observe these campaigns. We are fortunate to be able to build upon the strong foundations laid in recent years by organisations such as NDI/IFES, the EU and the Westminster Foundation for Democracy.

Yet whilst methodological reformers have long explored innovative approaches to examining phenomena such as online ads or digital media, one area that has received less attention within the elections field is the usage of innovative online tools to analyse hate speech on social networks. Perhaps as a result of the assumption that it is innately more subjective than dimensions such as online ad expenditure, comparatively few attempts have thus far been made to use innovative means to systematically track online hate speech within the domain of election observation.

Often, methodological inspiration can be found by looking at particular innovators operating within a single country, and then reflecting on how these methodologies might be applied in other contexts. It is in this context that it is a great pleasure to have been involved in supporting two innovative organisations in Kyrgyzstan, the Independent Union of Journalists and Kloop. As part of a consortium led by the European Partnership for Democracy with funding from ALDA – the European Association for Local Democracy, both implemented new approaches that challenge the boundaries of what has been achieved so far within the realm of election observation. In doing so, both combined innovative approaches with robust definitional frameworks inspired by the tried-and-tested approach of Article 19.

This has not been without challenges. Such is the nature of pioneering methodologies. For Kloop, one of the unique strengths of their approach has been how they have sought to deploy embeddings to observe Kyrgyz-language content. Yet the fact that Google Universal Sentence Encoder does not yet support the Kyrgyz language has meant that innovative alternatives had to be explored. For the Independent Union of Journalists, one challenge was how to present the results of an analytic methodology that has so far assessed more than 7000 articles. Yet a user-friendly interface, still a work in progress but already clear and well-defined, is making their work readily accessible.

In addressing these challenges, both organisations have made real progress that will have meaningful lessons for methodological reformers within election observation. The challenge, once the projects are finished, will be to connect their experiences with the wider debate on ways forward for both international election observation and domestic election observation in other countries. Indeed, finding ways to make the connection between CSO innovation and wider knowledge-sharing is a challenge that presents itself right across the field of democracy support.

The results of the project highlight the ongoing challenge hate speech poses in the democratic process. For example, impressively, IUJ’s methodology included the development of the first (to our knowledge) dictionary of terms associated with hate speech in the history of Kyrgyzstan. Developed in collaboration with an expert linguist, this helped the process of automation, thereby allowing the project to analyse a quantity of data that would have been unimaginable through manual means. It gave a sense of just how prevalent hate speech can be at election time.

In presenting such innovative new approaches, it is important to ensure analysts who will in time make use of the IUJ work can exclude legitimate political debate and critique from the dataset amassed through the methodology. To facilitate this, their work separated the incidences of hate speech by category groupings. IUJ analysts found that each of eight distinct types of hate speech were present in their sample, including incitement to violence. As other organisations look to their work, the challenge of ensuring that legitimate political discourse is not conflated with hate speech within automated analyses will be a major consideration, and emphasises the importance of pairing the power of automated data collection with human analytic interpretation who can verify and interpret the findings.

This election has also seen work undertaken not just to monitor, but to actively prevent hate speech. In parallel with the Media Dialogue project, project partner WFD collaborated with both the Central Electoral Commission of Kyrgyzstan and Civic Platform, a civil society organisation that supports the electoral process in Kyrgyzstan, to set defined standards against hate. This project saw the development of a memorandum of understanding and online consultations with political parties. The Memorandum outlines principles guiding the parties’ behaviour during the campaign ahead of the 4 October parliamentary election. A key element of the Memorandum was a commitment to avoid Hate Speech during the electoral campaign.

The Head of Central Election Commission of Kyrgyzstan, Nurzhan Shaildabekova Karmabekovna said: “… by signing the memorandum, political parties agree to multiply efforts to make elections fair and transparent. They also agreed not to use social media to denigrate opponents, and not to use Hate Speech”. It shows that important steps are being taken forward in both understanding the issue, but also in acting on it.

Whilst the projects are more pioneering steps forward rather than long-established finished products, significant progress has been undertaken. Whilst work is ongoing in the preparations for the rescheduled elections and in exploring how best to present the work undertaken so far, the steps forward in such a short space of time is impressive indeed.  It is a reminder how in the ongoing debate on how best to monitor not just hate speech, but the whole array of online phenomena in elections, international NGOs can seek ideas and inspiration by looking at the work of civil society organisations. Keeping that conversation moving forward with fresh energy in both directions is key for continued progress on observation methodologies for the online dimension of elections.

 

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